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Tuesday August 21, 2018

joomla

How to Protect Yourself in Cold Weather

When you're exposed to the cold, the first line of defense is to wear loose-fitting and dry clothing. Dress in layers. If you work in the cold, or exercise outside, wear clothing made of polypropylene, which will wick perspiration away from the skin and keep your body dry. Also, wear a hat and scarf. It's true that 40 to 50 percent of our body heat can be lost from the surface of the head and neck. And no, it doesn't matter if you have a thick head of hair. You still need protection.

Wear mittens when possible because your fingers can share warmth regular gloves are good, but mittens have the edge. Wear socks that will keep your feet dry and warm. Some people wear a light liner sock made of a material that wicks away moisture next to the foot and then put a natural fiber sock over it. Try to wear the higher cut socks, not the low risers.

Review and update your family emergency plan, including needs of infants and seniors. Replenish your emergency supply kits including battery-operated radio and flashlights.

Have extra blankets on hand. Clear rain gutters, repair roof leaks and cut away tree branches that could fall on a house or other structure during a storm. Check on family members and neighbors who are elderly or have special needs.

Drive only if it is absolutely necessary. If you must drive: travel in the day; don’t travel alone; keep others informed of your schedule; stay on main roads and avoid back road shortcuts. Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.

Gray, white or yellow skin discoloration, numbness or waxy skin are symptoms of frostbite. If you experience any of these symptoms, seek immediate medical attention.

Move family pets indoors or to an enclosure out of the elements. Likewise protect livestock or other large animals from the cold weather. Maintain a sufficient supply of heating fuel. Instruct the kids to come inside when they feel cold, or if their clothes get wet.

Because they pose a strangulation risk, it's best not to wrap children in scarves. Instead, use a neck "gaiter", which stays in place and keeps your child warm without risk. A snack before going out in the cold is better than a heavy meal, which requires a large blood flow to the gastrointestinal system to aid in digestion. The digestive process may prevent warm blood from circulating to your fingers and toes. Save the heavier meal for when you are safely back inside.

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